National Indigenous Critical Response Service – An Overview and Introduction

The 2018 Australian Rural & Remote Mental Health Symposium will be held next month over 15-17 October at the Hotel Grand Chancellor, Hobart, Tasmania.

Joining us at the conference is Ms Adele Cox, Chief Executive of Thirrili Ltd who will present on ‘National Indigenous Critical Response Service – An Overview and Introduction’.

Abstract

Suicide is the fifth leading cause of death for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and on average, the rates are two times that for other Australians. We also know those bereaved by suicide are at greater risk of suicidal ideation or attempt. Accordingly, it is important that:
• supports are available to individuals, families, and communities affected by suicide, and
• systems are developed to ensure appropriate community responses are implemented when a suicide or other trauma occurs to provide safety for those affected.

The National Indigenous Critical Response Service has been funded by the Commonwealth Government of Australia through the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet to:
1. Provide a critical response to support individuals, families and communities affected by suicide-related or other trauma that is culturally responsive to their needs
2. Strengthen community capacity and resilience in communities where there have been high levels of suicide to better recognise and respond to critical incidents and strengthen service system coordination.

The National Indigenous Critical Response Service has been operational in WA, SA and the NT since 1 January 2017 and has recently expanded into VIC and QLD in 2018. NSW, ACT and TAS will be rolled out in 2019. This presentation is an opportunity for those who are concerned by the high rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suicides to learn and share knowledge and experience about the important role that suicide postvention in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-specific context has as part of the broader suicide prevention efforts nationally. The workshop will present preliminary frameworks and models of care to the conference participants based on the work done extensively in the first 12 months of operation.

Key Learnings:
1. Hear about the innovate work and approach to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals, families and communities
2. Learn about key tools and resources to assist with prevention and postvention needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
3. Assist with and identify opportunities for collaboration and partnerships

Biography

Adele Cox is a Bunuba/Gija woman from the Kimberley region of WA and works as an advocate for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health in a range of areas, including more specifically mental health and suicide prevention. Beginning her career as a broadcaster/journalist in Broome and since then expanding into areas of research, policy and program development and ongoing advocacy. She is currently the Project Director of the National Indigenous Critical Response Service and is founder and Chief Executive of Thirrili Ltd, based in Melbourne.

For more information on the upcoming 2018 Australian Rural & Remote Mental Health Symposium please visit anzmh.asn.au/rrmh